Shan States and the British annexation.
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Shan States and the British annexation. by Sao Saimong Mangrai

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Published by Dept. of Asian Studies, Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Shan States

Subjects:

  • Shan States -- History.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 313-319.

SeriesCornell University. Dept. of Asian Studies, Southeast Asia Program. Data paper, no. 57
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS560 .S25 1965
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 319, lxxxiii p.
Number of Pages319
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5938928M
LC Control Number65008564
OCLC/WorldCa2076349

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COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle . The Shan States and the British Annexation Paperback – January 1, by Sao Saimong Mangrai (Author) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Author: Sao Saimong Mangrai. Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Saimong Mangrai, Sao. Shan States and the British annexation. Ithaca, N.Y., Dept. of Asian Studies. The British, whose success in administration was largely bound up with observance, of precedence in a hierarchy, listed states also as Sawbaships, Myosaships and Ngwegunhmuships. The following lists the Sawbwas in order of the precedence, at the time of the British annexation of the Shan States.

PREFACE i The author of this work, Sao Saimong Mangrai, is the son of a past Sawbwa of the Shan State of Kengtung, the husband of Daw Mi Mi Khaing, herself the writer of a wel. The Shan States and the British annexation / by Sao Saimong Mangrai Paperback – January 1, See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Paperback, January 1, Manufacturer: Ithaca, N.Y. Dept. of Asian Studies, Cornell University. Shan State is the unitary successor state to the Burmese Shan States, the princely states that were under some degree of control of the Irrawaddy valley-based Burmese kingdoms.. Historical Maw-Shan states extended well beyond the Burmese Shan States, ranging from full-fledged kingdoms of Assam in the northwest to Lan Xang in the east, to Lan Na and Ayutthaya in the Capital: Taunggyi. Sao Sai Mong spent most of his time visiting US and UK to write his book "annexation of Shan States by the British". In his travels throughout Shan States, his wife Daw Mi Mi Khaing (Educator and author) accompanied him and wrote many articles on the many traditions, cultures and diversity of the ethnic groups in Shan States, which would Reviews: 1.

Saimong Mangrai. The Shan States and the British Annexation. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Saimong Mangrai. The Pa ̄ ḍaeng Chronicle and the Jengtung State Chronicle Translated. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies. Sargent, Inge. Twilight Over Burma: My Life as a Shan Princess. A princely state, also called native state, feudatory state or Indian state (for those states on the subcontinent), was a vassal state under a local or indigenous or regional ruler in a subsidiary alliance with the British the history of the princely states of the subcontinent dates from at least the classical period of Indian history, the predominant usage of the term princely. The Shan State of Myanmar (also known as Burma) was once made up of a large number of traditional monarchies or fiefdoms. Three ranks of chiefs where recognized by the Burmese king and later by the British administration. These ranks were Saopha&#;. The British, whose success in administration was largely bound up with observance, of precedence in a hierarchy, listed states also as Sawbaships, Myosaships and Ngwegunhmuships. The follwing lists the Sawbwas in order of the precedence, at the time of the British annexation of the Shan States.